Adirondack Recovery


Lately, I’ve been promising to write about the state of the Adirondack business climate, Adirondack land value and the rebound of the Adirondack real estate market. But then something more interesting and engaging inevitably presents itself for discussion, like following the escapades of a young filly moose. I will indeed talk about a recovery today, although not a financial one.

Today’s Adirondack blog is about how restorative and rejuvenating it is to come back to the Adirondacks after a turbo-trip to the big city of Albany. Yesterday’s trip to the car doctor was a down-and-back in one day, which can be done but is not fun. I made it back before dark for the best part of the day; my trail run at Mount Van Hoevenberg.

I think because I went out for the run as soon as I arrived back in the Adirondacks, I could actually smell and taste the difference in the quality of the air. The day had been warm so the combination of the warm, damp ground and cool evening breeze swirled aromatic woodlands fragrances around me. Today’s blog star, Flatlander Flopsy Snowshoe Hare was the first to greet me as I started out on the mossy trail. The Evening Thrushes seemed especially melodic and even the Jays’ squawks sounded on key. The breeze kept the bugs at bay as I settled into the rhythm of the trail. After only an hour of Adirondack medicine I felt great, but the close temporal experience of Albany and then the wilderness was exceptional.

This Adirondack recovery reminded me of the classic quote from Goethe, one of my favorites from back in the day, “All that is noble is in itself of a quiet nature, and appears to sleep until it is aroused and summoned forth by contrast.”

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