Adirondack Moose on the Loose!


Moose are making a comeback in the Adirondack Region of upstate New York. According to the resident biologist, Saratoga County in the southern Adirondacks represents the southern border of moose territory in North America. He says some of them swam across the Lakes to get here from Vermont and some just ambled down from Quebec. Now the Adirondacks have a ‘breeding population’ (always a good thing) so we actually have some native moose running around - like the ones in today’s photo. In order to keep track of the moose population, Ed the resident biologist gets to fly around in a helicopter looking for moose. Here is a link to more photos from yesterday’s excursion. He found and photographed this cow moose and her two calves or babies. It looks like the sound of the helicopter may have interrupted their nap.

4 Comments

  1. TourPro

    That’s pretty interesting. It is incredible that they swim across the lake. I’m imagining the moose standing on the shore in Vermont and thinking, “Dang it, missed the ferry, gotta swim again.”

    I’ve only seen one in my years up here. Right on the side of the road on the Blue Ridge near the Elk Lake Rd.

    Most people don’t think of Moose, Bald Eagles, or Bear when they hear Adirondacks. Now we just need the Wolves back.

  2. City Mouse

    They SWIM?! That’s amazing. I hope they take the plunge at the skinny end of the lake. Or maybe if they are further North, they stop to rest at Grand Isle. What a cool story. Awesome that our animal populations are coming back.

  3. Joann

    Yes, I was shocked to learn they swim! I actually asked the resident biologist if they have webbed feet, right after he said they are a member (the largest) of the deer family. Duh.
    And, I am totally convinced we already have wolves here, although that opinion meets with some resistance here at the homestead.

  4. Ed

    The moose do tend to cross Lake Champlain at narrow spots, or they simply walk around the south end into Washington County, a common place for sightings.

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Translate »